Sunday, August 1, 2021

RANJANA SHARAN SINHA

 


THE DIGITAL PULL OF THE GENRE CALLED POETRY

 

Plato fiercely criticises poetry as a whole and professes to banish the tribe of poets from his Commonwealth. As a moralist, he disapproves of poetry because it is immoral, as a philosopher he disapproves of it because it is based in falsehood. He is of the view that philosophy is better than poetry because philosopher deals with idea/ truth, whereas poet deals with what appears to him/ illusion. But to quote Louisa Schaefer, poetry is one of the oldest cultural forms of humankind. It can affect all generations and make people feel and consider anything from love to loss. One of the fascinating things about poetry is also the experimental nature of it: from the range of poetic devices-- from alliteration to rhyme and rhythm-- to the many different forms that it could take-- from prose poetry to Shakespearean sonnets, and many more.

         

The essence of true poetry is that it comes from within-- a voice that is alive and roaring in the spirit of its wilderness untamed by society. Social media often influence you to view your work through the reader's mind by basing your success on likes and comments. But poetry is a sincere, honest calling of the heart and it has an infinite appeal. Culturally poetry is used in various ways and it has a power to inspire change like no other art form.

         

In the past poetry used to be an ambitious affair. Who can forget the timeless Iliad or Odyssey, or the magnificent poetry of the Romantic poets who were not afraid to take on larger- than- life projects. The life and works of Shelley exemplify English Romanticism in both its extremes of joyous ecstasy and brooding despair. Romanticism's major themes-- restlessness and brooding, rebellion against authority, interchange with nature, the power of visionary imagination and of poetry, the pursuit of ideal love and the untamed spirit ever in search of freedom -- all of these Shelley exemplified in the way he lived his life and live on in the substantial body of work that he left  the world after his legendary death by drowning.

        

The digital development of the past two decades have brought a revolution in the concept, form and writing of poetry. Earlier poetry was written with a pen or a pencil on paper. But these days almost every poet writes on their laptops or phones-- poetry is read and written more by the glow of smartphones than the flicker of candlelight. Majority of the people prefer to read poetry online than buy paperbacks or hardcover versions. I feel there is a sensual quality to print books that e- books lack. Whenever we hold a book in our hands, we feel its size, its weight and the quality of paper that is used. The smell of books blesses our olfactory bulb: if I make a sweeping generalization, I can say that books are one of the best- smelling things in the world, because they appeal  to explicit and implicit memory.

         

Digital poetry is born from the combination of technology and poetry with writers using all multi- media elements as critical text. Sounds, images, movement, video, interface/ interactivity and words are combined to create new poetic forms and experiences. It intends to communicate the extraordinary perception of the ordinary. Here the potentials expand beyond form-- letters, words, phrases, lines, line breaks, stanzas, enjambment and so on-- to incorporate colour, reader interaction, art and a third dimension of space.

          

There is a growing public interest in Insta Poetry. They are quite easy to grasp and question established norms of poetry as a literary form and lack the complexity and literariness of the established genre. Instagram poets, however, have been claimed as the driving force behind the a resurgence in U S. poetry readership. But other accounts have taken a dimmer view of this success. The world of Instagram poets have been called a "huckster's paradise" of self- promotion and media manipulation. These poets have been labelled as "bad" poets  because what they write is not really poetry. Writing in the venerable British journal P. N .Review, Rebecca  Watts decries the" open denigration of intellectual engagement and rejection of craft" evident in the " artless poetry" of Instagram poets.

        

 Poetry as a literary genre has undergone a noticeable change in the 21st century-- its frontiers have been extended and so many new dimensions have been added. Should we call it a 'renaissance'? For staunch traditionalists digital poetry likely challenges their definitions of what poetry should be, looking more like a maddening interactive website or irreverent game than the spontaneous emptying of Wordsworth's soul. But certainly, new approaches are required to analyse today's multimodal and intermedial forms of poetry.

         

The page and the printed book no longer constitute the sole focus of a poem's presentation and reception. In many countries, the poetry slam-- poetry in its most popular form-- fills large theaters. Culturally, poetry slams are a break with the past image of poetry as a rigid art form. It is because poems can be performed on the stage, spoken by professional speakers. They are available on you tubes or other social media platforms. There is a wide range of new experimental media poetry that employs kinetic script or natural or manipulated human voices, thus translating visual and sound poetry into the digital realm.

         

Bob Dylan-- an American musician and visual artist-- received the Noble Prize in Literature for having created new poetic expressions with the great American song tradition in the year 2016. It sparked a heated debate in academia and in feature pages as well. All of us are surprised-- what counts poetry and what does not!

         

In the present scenario poets either affirm and adopt media technologies and new event formats, or they remain in their established domain and present their work in old exquisite language. But even such poets who continue to publish their poetry in print are inevitably reacting to the pluralization of the genre in one way or the other. So we can't confine ourselves to closed containers of rigidity.

         

The most celebrated genre of literature -- poetry-evolved and attained maturity through a gradual process. In its earliest form it was oral recitation and it preceded writing. Theological and religious scriptures like Sanskrit Vedas are basically called 'Shruti' meaning what is heard  and this sets them apart from other texts which are called 'smriti' meaning what is remembered. Since then it has been constantly evolving adopting new forms, techniques and languages with a myriad of manifestations. We can compare the highly structured and formal old style poems with modern ones that use blank verse and free verse and are informal. I wish to conclude with these words, "... Just as words change, idioms fall in and out of custom, and language pools shrink and grow, so too does poetry." In this digital age the form and content of poetry has witnessed a sea change -- a boon or a bane?

 

DR. RANJANA SHARAN SINHA

From The Editorial Desk

OPA

A

WORLDWIDE WRITERS’ WEB

PRESENTATION!

 

PUBLISHED BY

 

OPA

 

OUR

POETRY ARCHIVE

ONLINE MONTHLY POETRY JOURNAL

https://ourpoetryarchive.blogspot.com

email us to:

ourpoetryarchive@gmail.com

**************************************


DONNA MCCABE IN CONVERSATION WITH NILAVRONILL

 

NILAVRONILL TALKING WITH

POET OF THE MONTH

DONNA MACCABE

AUGUST 2012



NILAVRONILL: Why do literature and poetry in particular interest you so much? Please give us some idea about your own perception of literature or poetry in general.

 

DONNA MCCABE:  I have always had a strong love of reading and writng for as long as I can remember, I don't think I could imagine a life without it,it's ingrained in my very being. Growing up I always surrounded by books and loved the escapism and insights they offered, I'm still the same today.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: How do you relate your own self existence with your literary life in one hand, and the time around you, in the other.

 

DONNA MCCABE: I make the most of each day as it comes, being a full time mum and wife life can get pretty busy and hectic. As a poet I am always observant, searching and looking for ideas that might inspire and ignite my imagination. A pen and notebook is always close to hand.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you believe creative souls flourish more in turmoil than in peace?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I have written in both scenarios and I do think turmoil can be a strong source of creativity to a person, giving them an outlet to express, confront and deal with situations they might not otherwise want to. It can be a floodgate of creativity as well as a healing process I have found.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you think in this age of information and technology the dimensions of literature have been largely extended beyond our preconceived ideas about literature in general?

 

DONNA MCCABE: There will always be people out there who have a love and passion for and of literature and I think that it will always find ways to adapt to these times we live in what with online accessibility, but you can never beat a good old book. I do think that technology has become more of an essential part of a writer’s life these days too, there are so many more platforms in which to promote one’s self globally in an instant. It played a massive fundamental role through the pandemic last year, keeping the people around the world connected in what was a dark and isolating time.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Now, in this changing scenario we would like to know from your own life experiences as a poet, writer and a creative soul: How do you respond to this present time?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I think everyone including myself is trying to adjust to this new way of living. It would be lovely to return to something somewhat similar to how we lived before but I think we have to face facts that life will never be quite the same again. I have continued writing right through these changing times and have seen a lot of great and artistic work emerge from it. The written word has lived on despite the pandemic.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you believe that all writers are by and large the product of their nationality? And is this an incentive for or an obstacle against becoming a truly international writer?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I think we as writers do make references to our cultures, heritage and places we grew up in at times, but we also explore the wider world around us, especially as we grow and mature in life and our craft.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Now, if we try to understand the tradition and modernism, do you think literature can play a pivotal role in it?  If so, how? Again, how can an individual writer relate himself or herself to the tradition and to modernism?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I think every literary movement has evolved and developed from the previous one and will continue to change with the times, even these fast passed times that we live in today.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you think literary criticism has much to do with the development of a poet and the true understanding of his or her poetry?

 

DONNA MCCABE: Criticism of a person’s work can be constructive even negative ones. They can help a writer take into consideration things that help them become better at their craft, stimulating them and increasing their self-esteem. I think we as writers can also be our own worst critics at times too, I know I can.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you think society as a whole is the key factor in shaping you up as a poet, or your poetry altogether?

 

DONNA MCCABE: Yes, I do, I think that in my poetry I have written about the society around me many times.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Do you think people in general actually bother about literature?  Do you think this consumerist world is turning the average man away from serious literature?

 

DONNA MCCABE: Society and the world at large has become caught up in this fast paste digital age of consumerism and has been pulled away from literature to an extent but I think there will always be that majority out there that will fight and preserve it for future generations.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: We would like to know the factors and the peoples who have influenced you immensely in the growing phase of your literary life.

 

DONNA MCCABE: My mum was a big influence during my childhood, surrounding me with a wide variety of wonderful books. Always encouraging me in reading, reading to me and with me. I have always loved writing and seriously started around 2001 with the encouragement of close friends and family.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: How would you evaluate your contemporaries and what are your aspirations for or expectation from the younger generation?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I do believe there a great many talented writers out there carrying the poetic touch and if a person has a love and passion for the craft, it is easily and readily available be it in books or online.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: Humanity has suffered immensely in the past, and is still suffering around the world. We all know it well. But are you hopeful about our future?

 

DONNA MCCABE: After seeing what the pandemic done to society and the world at large I think it pushed us more into a more virtually dependent world being isolated in our homes for such long periods of time. I do think sometimes that humanity has lost its way, we're to caught up in "progress for the sake of progress" we forget to stop and look at the beauty we're surrounded by and appreciate what we have right now. I would love to hope we can have a happier and brighter future.

 

 

NILAVRONILL: What role can literature in general play to bring a better day for every human being?

 

DONNA MCCABE: I think that literature should be encouraged so much especially to the up-and-coming generations. By being introduced and reading wide varieties of good books children learn to develop so many vital insights and skills in life. If you don't read you don't think, don’t stretch the imagination, don’t have access to knowledge.

 

 

DONNA MCCABE is an established poet with over 20 years’ experience whose vast variety of work has gained her multiple accolades within her field of literature.  From being published in journals, magazines and anthologies as well as being a highly respected admin in multiple social media groups, her most recent works of merit would include The Writers and Readers' Magazine, Our Poetry Archive,Raven Cage Zine and featuring in a book published by Poetry Planet called Words in Motion and Who's who of Emerging Writers 2021. Donna's intricate wordplay displayed in her works has been personified by her past and concurrent experiences which include her hardships, trials and tribulations. All of which she has been accompanied by her loving husband of 24 years. Together they have raised three children in the picturesque valleys of the Rhondda, South Wales.  Her lifetime admiration of reading and writing has steered her into a adventurous new direction of collaborations with an up and coming Canadian artist Alla Ilescu whose idiosyncratic mind and artistic works compliment the vivid images Donna's narrative works paint. These collaborations have resulted in a beautiful book of poetry and artwork entitled “Explosion Of Love” published on Amazon earlier this year.

 

 

DONNA MCCABE

 


DONNA MCCABE

 

Epiphanies

 

Ideas bursting forth

Words come pouring out

From the pen they flow

Filling the pages

No longer blocked

But released from the

Bondage of a blank page...

Donna McCabe ©

 

 

Guardian Angel

 

She was all mystical beauty and ancient charm

She had a soul so deep it could do no harm

She was as old as time

But as young as today

Sent to protect, honour and obey

To guide good souls along life's path

Help them stay steady

Help them through the wrath

A guardian, a saviour, an angel of mercy

Continuing her mission

Despite all the heresy.

Donna McCabe (C)

 

 

Cosmic Love

 

Our love was bound

By magical lock and key

Eons ago in eternity

When the stars were not born

And everything still black

A bond was formed

Our spirits made a pact

To travel through time

Seek each other out

Through life and rebirth

The karmic roundabout

And so it goes on

Our game of hide and seek

As into the future

Our souls will soon sneak. 

Donna McCabe ©

 

 

Life's Squall

 

Standing in the storm

Daring it to blow me away

Take me away from life's problems

Let me be free to play

Free of trials and tribulations

Arguments and sullen silence

Raised voices, threats

The threat of violence

I long for a simple life

Full of colour and peace

Not this storm that I'm living

That never seems to cease. 

Donna McCabe ©

 

 

New Beginnings

 

Light shines on a beauty hiding

Highlighting her time

To return to the world

To no longer shy away in the darkness

But to blossom and bloom once again

Scars once fresh and painful

Now healed and renewed

Her time to shine has come

To be reborn and imbued.

Donna McCabe ©

 

Tough Love

 

I was caught

In the gossamer

Of your love

Ensnared and tangled

In the web of deceit, you spun

Taken in by your charms

Always the prey

Even from the beginning

Oh how you played me well

Like a fly to the web

A fine dining ticket

You made of me..

But I managed to get free

Your grip not quite sticky enough

A lesson learned

That was some tough love.

Donna McCabe ©

 

DONNA MCCABE

 

DONNA MCCABE is an established poet with over 20 years’ experience whos vast variety of work has gained her multiple accolades within her field of literature. From being published in journals, magazines and anthologies as well as being a highly respected admin in multiple social media groups, her most recent works of merit would include The Writers and Readers' Magazine, Our Poetry Archive, Raven Cage Zine and featuring in a book published by Poetry Planet called Words in Motion. Donna's intricate wordplay displayed in her works has been personified by her past and concurrent experiences which include her hardships, trials and tribulations. All of which she has been accompanied by her loving husband of 24 years. Together they have raised three children in the picturesque valleys of the Rhondda, South Wales. Her lifetime admiration of reading and writing has steered her into a adventurous new direction of collaborations with an up and coming Canadian artist Alla Ilescu whos idiosyncratic mind and artistic works compliment the vivid images Donna's narritve works paint. These collaborations have resulted in a beautiful book of poetry and artwork entitled “Explosion Of Love” published on Amazon earlier this year.


ALEXEY E. KALAKUTIN

 


ALEXEY E. KALAKUTIN

 

A Fragment From The Poem

"The Sweet Martyr"

 

Sonechka

You turned to me with immense sadness, Anna,

As if I intertangled a dream with lie

And brighten up my life of self-deception,

My standing at the present time is shy,

And now's not the time to shout hosanna.

 

Anna

Oh, Sonechka, you at the present days

Are bride, your dreams and contemplations create

A shielding block of childish naives -

They cheer the heart while looking very great.

 

But there is one catch, and keep in mind:

The real life is not a great screenwriting,

Somewhat of fairy tales for cinema

With pictures full of love and magic lighting.

 

Life is a tough and bare-knuckled fight.

Unfortunately, endless snowfall

You can’t replace to cheerful days and light

Like little girl can easy change her doll.

 

I dreamed of happiness since I was small,

But life made alterations to my plans,

The stinking wooden dirty bench-hole

Is pictured in the midst of the grand palace.

 

Excuse me, I have lost the ethics stream,

And my impressive speech is for the contrast,

As far as those who are warmed by dream

Hit stiff headwinds, escapeless and full blast.

2020, Russia, Nizhny Novgorod

 

 

A fragment from the poem

 "The Sweet Martyr"

 

Rumors are flies and the tattles are gadflies

Feeling the high blood and stinging aggressively,

Driving the sting into flesh and the souls

Of the sovereigns and royal successors shamelessly.

 

The virulent piercers in Russian Empire

Fell to the lady from Alemannia,

That one inspiring love and admiration

Of high-minded Romanov, son of Emperor.

 

Anna, excuse me, I state things straightforwardly,

Wounding your feelings by tactless pronouncements,

Cannot be secretive, cannot gloss over,

Thoughts seething madly in brain like denouncements.

 

In former times, you remember, the common herd

Twisted the face with dislike for the empress,

As if for dinner not vodka, but cider

Is served with steak that is coarse and tasteless.

 

Members of gentry glanced at her askance,

Merchants did not start to dance with excitement.

Gingerbread cookies baked in the Russian lands

Didn't accept Alemannic sweet items.

 

Old and young, in a jacket and fashions,

Did not compassion the peregrine queen.

The ancestor worship is dear to Russians,

The image of Mother is in the genes!

 

Father the Tsar, and the queen should be Mother!

But she was born by the Britons and Germans.

To understand Russian world like the others

For stranger's heart is extremely uncommon!

 

You may the name Alexandra receive,

You may feel alone so much less,

But cannot wear your heart on your sleeve,

Because you are proud Alice of Hesse.

 

Big Russian soul cannot be bought!

You are a Russian since you were born –

With Pushkin, Yesenin, the noise of birches,

With tear of the Virgin inside your core!

2020, Russia, Nizhny Novgorod

 

ALEXEY E. KALAKUTIN

 

ALEXEY E. KALAKUTIN: Alexey Kalakutin (October 30, 1973) lives in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia. He is a Russian writer, a philologist. He studied at the Philological Faculty of Nizhny Novgorod State Pedagogical University. His debut publication is "Khokhloma Pattern", 1990 (fairy-tale novel for children) co-authored with E.V. Kalakutin. He is the author of six novels in verse, and and six long and extensive poetic pieces. His poetry has been translated into several languages and have been published in international magazines. He was awarded the 1st degree diploma (PWUR) for high professional skills. International Ambassador for Peace (WLFPH, Bhutan), Honorary Doctorate (IFCH, Morocco), participant in several international poetic anthologies, awarded with certificates of recognition..